9 comments

  • Florian GrauFlorian Grau, over 6 years ago

    You'll never guess what happened next ...

    9 points
    • Dirk HCM van BoxtelDirk HCM van Boxtel, over 6 years ago

      Like Mike Heitzke said; what happened next was an actually interesting article. So yeah, surprise surprise :]

      Do have one comment about it; I wonder if they pursued OTHER ways to make people more interested in the results. For example, showing the results of the underlying calculations.

      Just increasing the time seems like a cop-out.

      You could:

      • Show a paragraph explaining why this plan was chosen
      • Show the savings they'd get
      • Show the stats these savings are based on
      • Show comparisons to other plans, and how they score lowers

      Etc.

      Point is: I'm not sure the easy way out is always the right way.

      2 points
  • Mike HeitzkeMike Heitzke, over 6 years ago

    Awful title for what ended up being an interesting article. Perception is reality, and the context associated with the actions is important to be mindful of.

    7 points
  • Ben Kennerly, over 6 years ago

    TurboTax does this with a fake loader you can "skip" when they're "maximizing and confirming" your tax refund.

    6 points
  • Gary Robinson, over 6 years ago

    At first I thought 'nonsense' - I hate it when Facebook drags it's heels when I'm using it - but the article makes a good point about applying for a loans and mortgages. Context is important. With those it feels significant to do it 'properly' and not do instantaneously. Facebook though...just hurry up!

    2 points
  • Sabih MirSabih Mir, over 6 years ago (edited over 6 years ago )

    Ages ago now, but back in 2011 (were any of you born back then?? :P) there was an article about some research that was done around this idea of "labor illusion"—specifically discussing sites like Kayak where they can show you the results instantly, but people wouldn't trust the work unless they perceived some more effort was involved.

    https://hbr.org/2011/05/think-customers-hate-waiting-not-so-fast/ar/1

    0 points
  • John PJohn P, over 6 years ago

    Says a lot about Facebook users

    0 points
  • Jan SemlerJan Semler, over 6 years ago

    It is interesting that the "normal" world cannot adopt to the fast paced "digital" world. What i think about this that the outcome of animations and screen transition supports this theory. Sometimes we make decisions to cloud updates process to let the animation run a bit longer to show that the process is still runing while it is already finished. So that the user got time to understand what is happening.

    But I didn't recognize that is also an issue about the feeling what happens to your data and that it is a privacy issue in th emind of the user. This ist UX on a really interesting level and very sophisticated. But I think this will change if the snapchat kids are going to use applications on their worklaces in 5 - 8 years.

    0 points