Here's how I would redesign Twitter(behance.net)

almost 6 years ago from Igor Pascoal, Product Designer

  • Mitch Malone, almost 6 years ago

    Things I was hoping to see:

    • Design to curb abuse. It's the #1 problem affecting the community.
    • Better "thread" design. When people reply to long threads of tweets, it all gets jumbled up and quickly becomes incoherent.
    • Make it easier to get started with Twitter. Twitter's #1 business problem is acquiring and activating users. Right now it's hard because Twitter can be very confusing and/or not useful for casual users.
    7 points
    • gary ryan, almost 6 years ago

      Yeah, these are great points. I would expand onto the 3rd point and say twitter can feel bit isolating at first. You have to initially make a real effort to get any genuine connection with others out of it.

      2 points
    • John PJohn P, almost 6 years ago

      Design to curb abuse

      how exactly? the entire UX of the site encourages and is built toward rewarding this behaviour.

      it's actively designed against quantitative discussion.

      If you were to design a platform for cyberbullying from the ground up, would it honestly look any different from twitter?

      0 points
      • Mitch Malone, almost 6 years ago

        I'm not sure how it would work. All I know is it's a problem and I'd love to see it a solution in a redesign.

        0 points
        • Connor Tomas O'BrienConnor Tomas O'Brien, almost 6 years ago

          Did you ever use Branch (since acquired and sunset by Facebook)? It was, in my opinion, one of the most thoughtfully designed social networks I've ever used.

          In many ways, it was an evolution of Twitter, but structured from the ground up around respectful discussion. You had, from memory, 3-5x the character count for responses, and conversation threads were 'invite only' – anybody could watch a discussion play out, but would have to request permission from participants in order to participate. Those who weren't invited could simply 'branch' the conversation, in which case the original participants would not be notified – a perfect way to balance providing the ability to speak freely against targeted harassment.

          It's a real shame they weren't able to take the concept further. I'd love to see somebody develop a similar service as my guess is that Twitter is now organisationally incapable of executing something like this.

          0 points