There Are No Experts in the Web Industry(adrianpelletier.com)

over 7 years ago from Adrian Pelletier, Founder of Build Interactive

  • Duke CavinskiDuke Cavinski, over 7 years ago

    It seems in most academic fields, one can be considered an expert with the caveat that research goes on and that expertise will continue to broaden or adapt. I don't see how the web is any different, despite being a rather capricious medium.

    Perhaps the real target here is the semiotics in how we sell ourselves in a competitive market? I most certainly cringe when I read resumes with these charts where applicants have applied completely subjective skill levels to various tools & languages.

    But I don't see how it's impossible to reach an expert level in product management, content management, design, css, html, javascript, media production, or whatever we've got going on.

    All that said, I don't envision awarding myself a black belt in all-thing-web in this life time.

    6 points
    • Adrian PelletierAdrian Pelletier, over 7 years ago

      Thank you, Steven, all great feedback. I mentioned this in the Hacker News comments and I think it's worth repeating here:

      If we broke it down and asked can you be an expert in just HTML or CSS, the answer would likely be yes. However, if that's all you knew, you'd have a hard time being hired. The message I was trying to convey is to have a web career, you need to be constantly learn new things all the time.

      I also love what you said about cringing at some of the resumes being passed around. I completely agree and that over-confidence that some web entrepreneurs try to sell can become dangerous if they truly believe they have nothing left to learn.

      2 points
      • Duke CavinskiDuke Cavinski, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

        Thanks for expanding on your point.

        I must add then, that I think the vast majority of those in this industry of ours do fully embrace the impermanence of the technology and have a great love of learning. Of all the problems we're facing as an industry, I kinda doubt this one ranks particularly high (if you really wanna see feet stuck in the ground, take a walk around a literature department.)

        And besides, as you said, if you've got some Dunning-Kruger going on, you'll get weeded out sooner or later.

        0 points
        • Adrian PelletierAdrian Pelletier, over 7 years ago

          Thanks, Steven. Again, I have no disagreements with you here. Simply put, my article was a reminder aimed at web designers/developers who are either just beginning or have become too relaxed with not keeping up on the latest web news. In this field, you have to consider yourself a student whose learning is never finished.

          I do understand, though, that my article does not apply to everyone and there are undoubtedly a lot of creators on the web who already understand the importance of continued learning.

          0 points
    • Ben MJTBen MJT, over 7 years ago

      ...charts where applicants have applied completely subjective skill levels to various tools & languages.

      1000 x yes. The sooner this trend dies out the better, very common on personal sites too. Just filling space.

      0 points